Category Archives: Applied

These posts are dedicated to individual and joint applied research projects. That is, research that has an immediate socially useful outcome

Ultrasound Transducer Stabilizer for Children.

Our three-dimensional printable ultrasound transducer stabilizer has been a huge success. It is in use here at the University of Canterbury, as well as the University of Michigan, Hiroshima University, University of California, Los Angeles, and soon at the University of British Columbia. (And it is available at Western Sydney University).

However, Phil Hoole at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich figured out that the transducer stabilizer does *not* work with Children. He developed a solution to that problem, and I am making it available here. Within this zip file, there is a new probe holder. The base and clip-holder should be printed as is. Each remaining file needs to be scaled to 75% of their size and then printed. Each file marked with X2 needs to be printed *twice*.

I will put photos of this version of the probe-holder online once I have printed new copies and sewn all the pieces together sometime in October.

Rivener – a maskless airflow estimation and nasalance system

Myself, Jenna Duerr, and Rachel Grace Kerr recently published an article documenting the main instrumental uses for Rivener, our mask-less air flow estimation and nasalance system. This device records audio and low-frequency pseudo-sound with microphones placed at the nose and mouth, separated by a baffle and placed in a Venturi tube to prevent that pseudo-sound from overloading the circuitry.  The device can record all the aspects of hearing-impaired speech without interfering with the audio quality of the speaker or requiring physical contact with the system.  If you want a detailed description of what the system can do, here is an unpublished “white paper” documenting the strengths and limitations of the system in detail.

3D-printable ultrasound probe stabilizer for speech research

Christopher Carignan, Wei-rong Chen, Muawiyath ShujauCatherine T. Best, and I recently published an article about our new 3D-printable ultrasound transducer stabilizer (probe holder). 

Ultrasound tongue imaging of speech requires the imaging probe to remain stable throughout data collection. Previous solutions to this stabilization problem have often been too cumbersome and/or expensive for wide-spread use. Our solution improves upon previous designs in both functionality and comfort, while also representing the first free and open-source 3D printable headset for both academic and clinical applications of ultrasound tongue imaging.

The non-metallic design permits the simultaneous collection of ultrasound and electromagnetic articulometry. For clinicians, the headset eliminates the need for holding the imaging probe manually, allowing them to interact with patients in an unencumbered way.

The printable materials we provided work for midsaggital imaging of the tongue using a few select ultrasound transducers like the Logiq E 8C-RS and the Telemed transducers for Articulate Instruments systems, but can be modified easily to allow for other probes, or for coronal tongue imaging.

The system costs from $200 (for a 100 micron print) to $600 USD (for a 20 micron print) in materials to produce, making it quite affordable.  It is also very comfortable compared to most stabilization systems, and is accurate to within about 2mm of motion in any direction, and 2 degrees of rotation in any direction.  More details can be found in the article documenting the system.

Here is an image of the system, fully assembled and worn:

Transducer stabilizer

Transducer stabilizer